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Archive for the ‘Islam’ Category

  1. The parents of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) were believers and Sahaabi.
  2. The grave of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was prepared by Hazrat Abu Talha (radi Allahu anhu).
  3. Sayyiduna Jibraeel (alaihis salaam) came 24 000 times into the court of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam). (Zirkani)
  4. Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam) walked from India to Makkah and made forty Hajj. (Sheikh Zaada)
  5. Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam) had knowledge of 100 000 languages. (Roohul Bayaan)
  6. It is greater to listen to the Quran than reading Nafil and reciting. (Law)
  7. When the Quran is recited aloud, then it is Fardh to listen to it.
  8. Except in a Hifz class and Quran lesson, it is Haraam for people in a gathering to read Quran aloud.
  9. The Quran has been translated into fifty different languages to date. (Quran-e Kareem Number Dehli)
  10. Only 26 Ambiyas names have appeared clearly in the Quran.
  11. Only twelve Angels have been spoken of in the Quran.
  12. Except for the name of Zaid bin Haarith (radi Allahu anhu), no other Companions name appears explicitly in the Quran.
  13. Except the name of Sayyida Maryam (radi Allahu anha), the name of no other woman has come explicitly in the Quran.
  14. Amongst the Jinnat, only Shaitaan’s (Iblees’) name appears in the Quran.
  15. Iblees will not be punished with fire but with cold. (Roohul Bayaan)
  16. Those who pass away on a Friday or in Ramadaan will be saved from the questioning in the grave.
  17. At the time of death, a person is faced with 624 000 sorrows. (Roohul Bayaan)
  18. To respect the grave of a Muslim is necessary.
  19. To read Namaaz-e-Janazah or give Azaan inside the Mosque is Makrooh.
  20. Suicide is Haraam and a great sin, but the Janaza Salaah of a suicide victim must be performed. (Fatawa Afriqa)
  21. The place where Azaan is given is protected for that day from any calamities. (Fatawa Mustapha-wiya)
  22. To give Azaan at the grave-side or in one’s home and business is a means of blessing and mercy.
  23. To place green and fresh plants and flowers on the grave is good as they make the Tasbeeh of Allah. (Alamgeeri; Dur Mukhtar)
  24. Jannat is only for human Muslims. (Malfoozat)
  25. If a woman marries the second time, she will be in Jannah with the second husband. (Hadith)
  26. In Jannah, Hazrat Aasia and Hazrat Maryam (radi Allahu anha) will be amongst the wives of Rasoolullah (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam). (Fatawa Razvia)
  27. Hazrat Fathima Zahra (radi Allahu anha), although human, was free from menstruations, etc. like the maidens of Jannah. (Fatawa Razvia)
  28. Ramadaan and Eid should be celebrated by the physical sighting of the moon or by the receiving Shar’i Shahaadat. Calendars should not be followed for performing Ibaadah such as Eid Salaah.
  29. On the 10th of Muharram, Zam-Zam is mixed in all the pure waters of the world. (Roohul Bayaan)
  30. The sky is above and the sun, moon and stars are all below the sky.
  31. The sun and the moon are in motion.
  32. To drink, sell, touch, serve, keep or do any transaction with alcohol are all Haraam.
  33. Nikah is only done out of happiness and consent.
  34. When joking, or even playing and one gives Talaaq, then it becomes applicable.
  35. From all the Halaal things in the world, the most disliked by Allah is Talaaq.
  36. For men to dress and behave like women and for women to dress and behave like men is Haraam.
  37. For men to wear gold is Haraam.
  38. Men should wear one silver ring not weighing more than four and a half marsha (ounce).
  39. To stand before “Haya Alas Salaah, Haya alal Falaah” in Iqaamat is Makrooh and to stand on hearing it is Mustahab.
  40. Four Ambiya are still physically alive. In other words, they had not tasted death as yet. They are Hazrat Esa and Hazrat Idrees (alaihimus salaam) in the skies and Hazrat Khidr and Hazrat Ilyaas (alaihimus salaam) are on the earth. (Madaarik)
  41. Hazrat Ilyaas and Hazrat Khidr (alaihimus salaam) make Hajj annually and they meet at the well of Zam-Zam wherefrom they drink. Thereafter, they do not find the need to eat or drink for the entire year. (Fatawa Razvia)
  42. Four persons conquered the whole world from East to West, two were Muslims and two Kaafirs. the two Muslims were Hazrat Zul Qarnain and Hazrat Sulaiman (alaihis salaam). The two Kaafirs were Namrood and Bukht Nassar.

HISTORIES FIRSTS

  1. Almighty Allah first created the Noor of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) from His Noor.
  2. The first adult free male to accept Islam was Hazrat Abu Bakr Siddique (radi Allahu anhu); the first woman was Hazrat Khadija (radi Allahu anha); amongst the children, Hazrat Ali (radi Allahu anhu); among the freed slaves, Hazrat Zaid Bin Haarith (radi Allahu anhu); and amongst the slaves was Hazrat Bilal (radi Allahu anhu).
  3. The first wife of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was Hazrat Khadijatul Kubra (radi Allahu anha).
  4. Hazrat Khadija (radi Allahu anha) was the first of the Holy Prophet’s (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) wives to pass away.
  5. Hazrat Qaasim (radi Allahu anhu) was the first of the Holy Prophet’s (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) children to be born. He passed away in his infancy.
  6. Hazrat Khadija (radi Allahu anha) was the first person to read Namaaz amongst the Ummah of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  7. The home of Hazrat Abu Ayub Ansaari (radi Allahu anhu) was the first place where the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) stayed in Madina Shareef.
  8. The first verse of the Holy Quran to be revealed was “Iqra Bi Ismi Rabbikal Lazi Khalaq”. This took place on Friday, 27th of Ramadaan on the night of Qadr thirteen and a half years before Hijra, coinciding with the 14th of August 610 A.C. in the cave of Hira.
  9. Hazrat Jibraeel (alaihis salaam) gave the first Azaan in the skies.
  10. The first Azaan on earth was given by Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam).
  11. Hazrat Bilal (radi Allahu anhu) gave the first Azaan in the year 1 A.H. to announce the Namaaz of Fajr.
  12. The Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) performed the first Jummah Salaah in Madina Munawwarah on the 12th of Rabi-ul-Awwal.
  13. The first Hajj became Fardh in the year 9 A.H.
  14. The first Fardh fast was that of Ashurah (10th Muharram). This was then nullified and the fasting on the 13th, 14th and 15th of every lunar month became Fardh. This was also nullified, and on the 10th of Shawaal in 2 A.H., fasting for the entire month of Ramadaan was made Fardh and the remainder of the fasts was made Nafil (optional).
  15. The first Muslims migrated towards Abyssinia.
  16. The first battle to take place was the Ghazwa Abwaa.
  17. The first Sadqa was given by Hazrat Adi bin Haatim (radi Allahu anhu) on behalf of his people.
  18. The Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) established the first madrassah (Suffah) in Musjid-e-Nabawi.
  19. The first person sent to spread Islam under the instructions of the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was Hazrat Mus’ab bin Umair (radi Allahu anhu), who was sent to Madinah.
  20. The first person to be appointed a teacher in the madrassah was Hazrat Mus’ab bin Umair (radi Allahu anhu).
  21. The first Mosque to be built was Musjid-e-Quba, which the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) built himself. After the Holy Kaaba, the Musjid-e-Nabawi and the Musjid-e-Aqsa, the most excellence is given to Musjid-eQuba. Two rakaats of Salaah in this Musjid is equivalent to the Sawaab of one Umrah.
  22. Sayyiduna Ameer Mu’awiyah (radi Allahu anhu) constructed the first Minaret built for the purpose of Azaan.
  23. The first Mehraab for Imaamat was built by Sayyiduna Umar bin Abdul Aziz (radi Allahu anhu).
  24. Hazrat Tameem Daari (radi Allahu anhu) was the first person who sent his slave, Fateh, to light a candle in Musjid-e-Nabawi. Due to this act, the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) changed his name to “Siraaj”.
  25. The first Shaheed (Martyr) was Sayyiduna Amaar bin Yaasir (radi Allahu anhu).
  26. The first female to be made Shaheed was the mother of Sayyiduna Amaar bin Yaasir (radi Allahu anhu). Her name was Sayyidah Summaya (radi Allahu anha).
  27. The first person to be martyred in the Battle of Badr was the freed slave of Hazrat Umar (radi Allahu anhu), whose name was Muhaj’jah (radi Allahu anhu).
  28. The first person to make Ijtihaad was Sayyiduna Abu Bakr Siddique (radi Allahu anhu).
  29. Hazrat Abu Zirr Ghaffari (radi Allahu anhu) is known as the first Dervish.
  30. Hazrat Abdullah ibn Maz’oom (radi Allahu anhu) was the first person to be buried in Jannatul Baqi. The Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) buried him here in the year 2 A.H.
  31. Hazrat Umar (radi Allahu anhu) was the first person to perform Janazah Salaah in Jamaat with four Takbeers.
  32. The first person to start writing the Muslim calendar was Sayyiduna Umar (radi Allahu anhu).
  33. Sayyiduna Sa’ad ibnil Waq’qaas (radi Allahu anhu) was the first person to fire an arrow towards the Kuffar.
  34. The first person to become murtad (out of the folds of Islam) was either Muqees bin Khubaaba or Ubaidullah bin Jahash.
  35. The first false claimant of Prophethood was Musailma Kazzab who claimed Prophethood in the time of Sayyiduna Rasoolullah (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  36. A person called Abdullah Chakraalwi from Miyanwaali, Punjab, Pakistan was the first person to openly reject the Ahadith-e-Mustapha (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  37. The first translation of the Holy Quran was in Persian. Sayyiduna Sheikh Saadi Shiraazi (radi Allahu anhu) accomplished it.
  38. The first Urdu translation of the Holy Quran was made in the year 1774 by Shah Rafi’ud’deen (radi Allahu anhu).
  39. The first mountain to be created on earth was Mount Bu Qubais, which is near the Holy Kaaba. After the great flood, the Hajr-e-Aswad remained protected within this mountain, and the splitting of the moon took place on this very mountain.
  40. The first physical human to be created is Sayyiduna Adam (alaihis salaam).
  41. Man first descended on earth in India.
  42. The first Rasool to be sent towards the Kuffaar was Hazrat Nooh (alaihis salaam).
  43. The first idol worshipping took place in the time of Hazrat Nooh (alaihis salaam).
  44. The first murder on earth took place when Hazrat Adam’s (alaihis salaam) son, Qaabil, killed his brother Haabil.
  45. The first person to be put into Hell will be Qaabil.
  46. In the Ummah of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam), the first person to enter Jannah will be Hazrat Abu Bakr Siddique (radi Allahu anhu).
  47. The first person to awake from his grave on the Day of Qiyamah will be the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  48. The first person to be clothed on the Day of Qiyamah will be Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam).
  49. Sayyiduna Jibraeel (alaihis salaam) will be the first person to be questioned on the Day of Qiyamah.
  50. The first person to be brought back to life on the day of Qiyamah will be Hazrat Israfeel (alaihis salaam).
  51. From amongst the animals, the first animal to be brought back to life will be the Buraaq of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  52. The first person to intercede on the Day of Qiyamah will be the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  53. The first person to enter Jannah will be the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  54. The first meal in Jannah will be fish liver.
  55. The Angels did the first construction of the Holy Kaaba.
  56. The first person to place a Ghilaaf (Cloth) on the Holy Kaaba was a person called Asad who was the King of Yemen.
  57. The first Arab woman to place a silk cloth over the Holy Kaaba was Nateela, who was the mother of Hazrat Abbas ibn Abdul Mutallib (radi Allahu anhuma).
  58. Hazrat Idrees (alaihis salaam) used the first pen.
  59. Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam) was the first person to circumcise himself and his son.
  60. The first persons hair to turn white in colour was that of Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam).
  61. Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam) was the first person to wear a sewn trouser.
  62. Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam) was the first person to build a Mimbar (Pulpit) and to deliver a sermon from it.
  63. The first person to make Mu’aaniqa (embrace shoulder to shoulder) was Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam).
  64. Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam) was the first person to hold an Aasa (Staff).
  65. Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam) made the first Salaam to the Angels.
  66. The Angels made the first Sajda-e-Tazeem or Sajda of Respect to Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam). (N.B.: Sajda-e-Tazeem is Haraam for the Ummah of the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  67. The first person to make Gustakh-e-Nabi (Insultor of a Prophet – sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was Shaitaan.
  68. The first person to say “Subhaan-Allah” was Hazrat Jibraeel (alaihis salaam) when he saw the beauty of the Arsh.
  69. The first person to say “Alhumdulillah” was Hazrat Adam (alaihis salaam) when the soul was put into him.
  70. The first person to say “La ilaha Ilal laah” was Hazrat Nooh (alaihis salaam) when he saw the Great Flood.
  71. The first person to say “Allahu Akbar” was Hazrat Ibrahim (alaihis salaam) when he saw the ram in place of Hazrat Ismaeel (alaihis salaam).
  72. The first Namaaz of Eid-ul-Fitr was performed in the year 2 A.H. in Madinatul Munawwarah.
  73. Hazrat Buraida Aslami (radi Allahu anhu) planted the first Flag of Islam.
  74. The first battle fought for the protection of Islam was the Battle of Badr in Ramadaan 2 A.H.
  75. Sayyiduna Zubair bin Aw’waam (radi Allahu anhu) was the fist person to draw his sword for Islam.
  76. Sayyiduna Haarith bin Abi Haalah (radi Allahu anhu) was the first Sahabi to give his life for Islam in Makkah.
  77. The first enemy of Islam to be killed in the battle of Badr was Utbah bin Rabi.
  78. The first Namaaz-e-Janazah performed by Sayyiduna Rasoolullah (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was that of Asad bin Zaraara (radi Allahu anhu).
  79. The first Namaaz to be made Fardh was Tahajjud Namaaz, which was later made Nafil.
  80. The first time that four Rakaat Namaaz was read was after the Hijrat in Madinah.
  81. The first person to recite the Holy Quran aloud after the Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) in Makkah was Hazrat Abdullah ibn Mas’ood (radi Allahu anhu).
  82. The first Ibaadat on earth was Tauba (repentance).
  83. The first person to have the Ghilaaf of the Kaaba embroided with verses of the Holy Quran was Sultan Hassan of Egypt in 761 A.H.
  84. The first person to be called “Ameerul Mo’mineen” was Hazrat Umar (radi Allahu anhu).
  85. The first Mujaddid of Islam is Hazrat Umar bin Abdul Aziz (radi Allahu anhu).
  86. Hazrat Sayyiduna Abu Yusuf (radi Allahu anhu) was the first Muslim Qaazi-ul-Qazah (Chief Justice) in the time of Haroon Rasheed.
  87. Sayyiduna Sa’ad ibn Abil Waqqas (radi Allahu anhu) was the first Sahabi to be a conqueror.
  88. The first Hafizul Quraan in the Ummah was Hazrat Uthman-e-Ghani (radi Allahu anhu).
  89. The first Namaaz to be performed openly in the Kaaba was after Hazrat Umar (radi Allahu anhu) accepted Islam.
  90. Sayyiduna Umar (radi Allahu anhu) was the first person to start Salaatul Taraweeh in Jamaat.
  91. The first Khalifa (Caliph) of the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) was Sayyiduna Abu Bakr Siddique (radi Allahu anhu).
  92. The first stanzas of Naath (Poetry in Praise of the Prophet – sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) were written by Tub’bah, the King of Yemen, one thousand years before the Birth of the Holy Prophet (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam). He had also written a Will in which he left instructions that when the Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam) is born, then these verses of praise should be presented to him.
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Ghusal is a means of preparing one’s self for Ibaadat (Worship of Allah). Ghusal is a necessity for a true Muslim. The importance of Ghusal has been mentioned in both the Holy Quran and in the Ahadith. The verse of the Holy Quran that commanded Ghusal as a Fardh Action was revealed in the Holy City of Makkah. Almighty Allah commands in the Holy Quran that “if you are in an impure state, then purify yourself well.” Almighty Allah is Pure and Allah loves all that which is pure. It is on the authority of Hazrat Abu Qatadah (radi Allahu anhu) that The Holy Prophet Muhammad (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam)
said, “Cleanliness is half your Imaan.”

There are five factors that make Ghusal Fardh (obligatory) on a person. The first three that we have enlisted are for both males and females, while the last two are only for females. These are:-

  1. Wet dream causes Ghusal to become Fardh.
  2. Sexual intercourse will make Ghusal Fardh on both persons.
  3. Ejaculation caused due to lust makes Ghusal Fardh.
  4. Ghusal is Fardh on women on termination of her menstrual periods.
  5. Ghusal is also Fardh on a female after Nifaas (puerperal haemorrhage).

There are also three actions in Ghusal that are Fardh. These are:-

  1. To rinse the mouth thoroughly.
  2. To clean the nostrils thoroughly.
  3. To wash the entire body in such a manner that not even an area equal to a strand of hair be left dry. If this is not done properly, then Ghusal will not be done.

Even though one may be in a pure state, there are certain instances where it is either desirable (Mustahab) of Sunnah to make Ghusal.

It is Sunnah to perform Ghusl for the following:-

  1. For the Jummah Salaah.
  2. For Eid Salaahs.
  3. On the day of Arafaat (9th Zil-Hajj – Day of Hajj).
  4. Before tying one’s Ihraam.

It is Mustahab to perform Ghusl for the following:-

  1. When waiting in Arafaat and Muzdalifa.
  2. When visiting the Holy Haram (Kaaba).
  3. Before visiting the Blessed Tomb of Sayyiduna Rasoolullah (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  4. Before entering Mina.
  5. Before hitting the Jamraah.
  6. On the eve of the Birth of Holy Prophet Muhammad  (sallal laahu alaihi wasallam).
  7. For Lailatul Qadr.
  8. For  Lailatul Baraat.
  9. For Lailatul Me’raaj.
  10. On the eve of Eid.
  11. On the eve of Arafaah.
  12. On the eve and day of Aashurah  (10th Muharram).
  13. Before wearing new clothes.
  14. Before making Tauba (repenting) from one’s sins.
  15. For Salaatul Istisqaa.
  16. For Namaaz at the time of eclipse.
  17. Before teaching the Holy Quran and Ahadith.
  18. After bathing the deceased.
  19. After coming out of an unconscious state.
  20. Before and after a journey.
  21. After Istihaaza (Sickness of women).
  22. On recovering from illness.
  23. At the time of fear.
  24. During a storm.
  25. Before a wedding or any happy occasion.
  26. When visiting Holy Places such as Mazaars, etc.
  27. When going to meet a learned Scholar of Islam.

With the EXCEPTION of the above mentioned, it is also a good habit to bathe twice daily, in the morning on awakening and at night before going to bed.

The Sunnah method of Ghusal: One should first make Niyyah in the heart of Ghusal to gain purification from impurities. Both hands should then be washed till the wrist. The pubic areas should then be washed thoroughly removing any impurities. Impurities on any other portion of the body should be washed. One should then perform Wudhu. The entire body should then be washed thoroughly. Water must then be poured thrice over the right shoulder, then thrice over the left shoulder, thrice over the head, and then thrice over the entire body. One must make sure that the water passes over the body properly not leaving any dry spots. Thereafter, it is preferable for the feet to be washed after coming out of the bathroom. After making Ghusal in this way, one may read the Holy Quran or perform Salaah. There is no need to repeat Wudhu unless Wudhu becomes nullified (breaks). When making Ghusal, one is not allowed to read anything or talk unnecessarily.

Dear Friends! We should be clean and pure at all times, for none knows when death will come. May Almighty Allah keep us amongst the pure. Aameen.

Source: http://www.yanabi.com/activeweb.cfm?a_id=937

Fasting and YogaIn nature cure, one of the very important tools for health and disease cure is fasting.
Many people are learning the trick of curing their colds, headaches, nervous spells and other acute troubles by missing a few meals or taking a short fast. It is the simplest and the most efficient way of relieving the overloaded and “food-poisoned” system. You would be surprised to know how little food is actually required to keep the individual healthy.
One of the commonest complaints of the sick is that they have “lost their appetite”. In fact, the greatest blessing to them would be to lose their appetite long enough to find their hunger. Loss of appetite is an indication that the system is overcharged with toxins and nature is trying to correct this by giving a chance to the waste accumulation in the organs to escape from the system.
Fasting as a remedy is fully in harmony with the “nature-cure” philosophy of the cause of disease. If the disease is created by an abnormal accumulation of toxins in the system, it stands to reason that fasting will help in their elimination from the system. The membranous linings of the stomach and intestine which act as a “sponge” to absorb food materials are now “squeezed” to throw out the waste matter from the system.

Exercises While Fasting

The idea prevails that during a prolonged fast one should have complete rest. This however, is a serious mistake. There is no reason why one should not take the usual amount of or accomplish the accustomed daily tasks, provided, these do not strain the physical and mental energy to the point of exhaustion.

Source: http://www.healthandyoga.com/html/fasting.html

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How Tos of Fasting

The Obligation

Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. It is an act of obedience and submission to Allah’s commands through the highest degree of commitment, sincerity and faithfulness to seek Allah’s mercy, to atone for sins, errors, and mistakes and to avoid condemnation to Hell.

It is done out of deep love for God, with a genuine virtue of devotion, honest dedication and closeness to Allah, for Fasting is for Allah and Him alone.

The fasting during Ramadan is obligatory on every adult, sane, and able Muslim.

Denial of the obligatory nature of fasting in the month of Ramadan amounts to disbelief.

One who avoids fasting without genuine reasons is a sinner and transgressor according to Islamic Shariah (Law).

Time: When to fast

Fasting in Islam involves abstinence from three primal physical needs of human beings- food, drink, and sexual intercourse from dawn (approximately one and a half hours before sunrise) to sunset during the entire month of Ramadan.

Who is exempted from fasting

1. Children under the age of puberty and discretion;

2. The insane people who are unaccountable for their deeds. People of these two categories are exempted from the duty of fasting and no compensation or any other substitute is enjoined on them;

3. Men and women who are too old and feeble to undertake the obligation of fasting and bear its hardships. Such people are exempted from this duty, but they must offer at least one needy poor Muslim an average full meal or its value per person day.

4. Sick people whose health is likely to be severely affected by fasting. They may postpone the fast, as long as they are sick, to a later date and makeup for it, a day for a day;

5. People expecting hardship. Such people may break the fast temporarily during their travel only and make up for it in later days, a day for a day. But it is better for them, the Quran says, to keep the fast if they can without causing extraordinary hardships;

6. Expectant women and women nursing their children may also break the fast, if its observance is likely to endanger their own health or that of their infants. But they must make up for the fast at a delayed time, a day for a day;

7. Women in periods of menstruation (of a maximum of ten days). They must postpone the fast till recovery and then make up for it, a day for day.

The How To’s of Fasting

Niyyah or Intention of Fast

To observe the fast, the intention of fasting is essential (Wajib). The intention should be made daily, preferably before dawn of each day of fasting (in Ramadan).

Provision is made if someone has forgotten to express his intention before dawn. In such a case one is allowed to express intention of fasting before noon to avoid the invalidation of the fast.

The wording of Niyyah may be as follows:

“I intend to observe fast for today.”

Suhoor

Suhoor is a light, predawn meal, recommended before actually fasting. It is a blessing and hence recommended but not essential.

Any consumption of food or drink should cease at least five to ten minutes before the onset of dawn.

Iftar

Iftar is an Arabic term meaning breaking the fast immediately after the sunset. Iftar is a light snack consisting of dates or desserts, along with liquids, such as water, juice or milk.

This is eaten after making the following Dua (supplication) for breaking the fast:

“Oh Allah!  I fasted for your sake and I am breaking my fast from the sustenance You blessed me with, accept it from me.”

What breaks the fast

  1. Intentional consumption of food, drink, medicine, or smoking during the fasting.
  2. Any injection which has some nutritional value.
  3. Beginning of menstruation or post natal birth bleeding (even in the last moment of sunset).

The conditions mentioned above invalidate fasting and require “Qada” (making up only the missed day or days). However, intentional intercourse during the hours of fasting invalidates fasting and not only requires “Qada” but also additional penalty (Kaffara-see the explanation of this below).

What does not break the fast

  1. Eating or drinking by mistake, unmindful of the fast.
  2. Unintentional vomiting.
  3. Swallowing things which are not possible to avoid, such as one’s own saliva, street dust, smoke, etc.
  4. Brushing the teeth.
  5. Bathing: if water is swallowed unintentionally, it does not invalidate the fast. However, while fasting gargling should be avoided.
  6. Injection or I/V (Intravenous) which is solely medicinal and not nutritional.
  7. In some special circumstances if the food or drink is just tasted and immediately removed out of the mouth without allowing it to enter into the throat.

Kaffara

During the fasting period, if one deliberately breaks his or her fast, s/he must free one slave, or fast for sixty continuous days, or feed sixty needy persons, or spend in charity an amount equal to feeding sixty persons.

If one chooses to fast sixty days and the continuity is interrupted for any reason, except menstruation, one has to start the sixty day cycle all over again.

Breaking of the fast under exceptional conditions

Muslims are permitted to break their fast of Ramadan when there is a danger to their health.

In this situation a Muslim should make up his/her fast later. The missed fast(s) can be made up at any other time of the year, either continuously or intermittently, except on the day of Eid-ul-Fitr and the day of Eid-ul-Adha

Tarawih

These are special Sunnah prayers in the month of Ramadan. They follow the Isha prayers.  A minimum of eight and a maximum of twenty Rakat are offered in pairs of two.

Lailat al-Qadr

Amongst the nights of Ramadan, there is one special night of Power (Qadr) which is highlighted in Surah al-Qadr (Surah 97 in the Quran).

It has the significance of being better than a thousand months (Quran 97:3).

This was the night when Quran was revealed to mankind. Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) recommended Muslims search for this night of Power (Qadr) in the odd nights of the last ten nights in Ramadan.

Muslims spend the night in Ibadah (worship), asking forgiveness of their sins and reciting the Quran.

Source: http://www.soundvision.com/info/ramadan/howfast.asp

Zakat

Posted on: August 12, 2008

Allah (SWT) says in the Quran-e-Majid that one who gives “Zakat” and remembers Him will get salvation. Here, Zakat means “Fitra” and remembrance of God means the recitation of the following Takbir on the night and morning of Eid al-Fitr.

“Allaaho Akbar, Allaaho Akbar, Laa ilaaha illallaah wallaaho Akbar, Allaaho Akbar, Wa lillaahil hamd. Alhamdulillah alaa maa hadaanaa walahu Shukr alaa maa aulana.”

The meaning of the above is: “Allah is Great, Allah is Great there is no one worthy of prayer but Allah, and Allah is Great; Allah is Great, all praise be to Allah, it is He Who guides.”

Zakat al-Fitr is a small amount that Muslims are obliged to pay as charity at the end of Ramadan. Zakat al-Fitr is often referred to as Sadaqah al-Fitr (voluntary charity). The word Fitr means the same as Iftaar, breaking a fast and it comes from the same root word as Futoor which means breakfast. Thus, Islamically, Zakat al-Fitr is the name given to charity which is distributed at the end of the fast of Ramadan.

Zakat al-FitrFitr is compulsory on those who can afford it, and it is a sin not to give it.

Hazrat Imam Jafar-e-Sadiq (A.S.) has said that fasts do not attain perfection without Fitr just as Namaz is not accepted without invoking the blessings of Allah on Mohammad (S.A.W.) and his Aaal (A.S.) in Tashahhud. Hazrat Imam Jafar-e-Sadiq (A.S.) used to instruct his accountant to take out Fitr for each individual including slaves and servants male and female of his household without exception, as, he feared that one whose Fitr was not taken out might die within that year.

Fitr is dependant on the major item of food consumed by a person during the year. These may be rice, wheat, barley, dates, etc. In weight Fitr should be three Kilograms per person. It is also permissible to pay cash to the value of three Kilograms food grains.

It is obligatory on the head of the family to give Fitr of all persons (including servants of both sexes of any cast or creed) that take food in his house.

If a guest Muslim or non-Muslim arrives at one’s house before the night of Eid al-Fitr and dines with his host, it is incumbent on the latter to give the former’s Fitr. If the guest arrives after sunset of the night of Eid al-Fitr. Fitr is not obligatory even if he dines with his host. Even when the guest arriving before sunset does not dine, Fitr is obligatory on the host. In this it is better if both the host and the guest give Fitr.

If one’s wife is at her parent’s on the night of Eid al-Fitr, her parents should take out her Fitr.

On the last day of the month of Ramadan, if a person arrranges a Majlis which finishes afer sunset (Magrib) and if, he offers Niyaz or food to his guests, he does not have to give Fitr for them.

Fitr should be given to deserving Momins who do not have enough income for the maintenance of their families for the whole year.

Fitr cannot be given to one’s dependants. But, it is better to give it to non-dependant deserving relatives. Next in order of preference are deserving neighbors and then any other deserving pious persons. Fitr from Syeds can be given to Syeds or non-Syeds. Fitr from non-Syeds cannot be given to Syeds.

If deserving persons are not really available, Fitr should be sent to places where such persons are found, or the amount should be sent to a Mujtahid who would do the needful in distributing the same.

It is not essential that the recipient of Fitr is an “Aadil” (just), but it is necessary to ensure that it is not given to anyone likely to use it in acts of sin, e.g. drinking liquor, gambling, etc.

Although it is permissible to send Fitr to any place it is preferable if it is distributed to a deserving person locally.

The time for giving Fitr is from the night of Eid al-Fitr (Ramadan Eid) up to the noon (Zohr) of Eid al-Fitr. If this is not possible for some reason the amount of Fitr should be set apart from his other monies and disbursed when deserving person is available or it may be sent to a Mujtahid for required distribution.

It is stated that Fitr ought to be given to pious persons and not those who indulge in sin.

Eid al-FitrIN RETROSPECT:

And now that the Holy Month of Glory (Ramadan) has departed and Eid is over, let us look back to the lessons it has taught us, and let us pray to God that the things we observed the recitation of the Holy Quran, the saying of Prayers (Namaz) regularly, the charity which we did, the poor that we fed, the good manners and self-restraint that we observed, should be with us in our everyday lives and these are the very ACTS that take us nearer to Allah.

And Allah has said, “Therefore remember Me, I will remember you, and be thankful to Me, and do not be ungrateful to Me.” (2:152)

“If ye are grateful, I will add more (favors) unto you; But if ye show ingratitude, truly My punishment is terrible indeed.” (14:7)

And to those who have been indifferent and have wished that there was no such thing as this month of Ramadan and who on sighting the New Moon had a dejected face, should remember this Ayat of the Holy Quran.

“Call on Me; I will answer your (Prayer): but those who are too arrogant to serve Me will surely find themselves in Hell – in humiliation!” (40:60)

But can ye not see, O men, the mighty workers of God in the heavens and the earth? The dark-some splendor of the night with the stars, and the daylight splendor of the sun? How the earth with its spacious expanse and its mountains, yields moisture and pasture, and feeds and sustains men and cattle, through God’s Providence?

AH! Transgress not all bounds and earn not the fire of punishment, but fear God and His Judgment, and prepare for the Garden of Perpetual Bliss.

ZAKAT AL-FITR and ZAKAT (ZAKAH) are different: (Alms giving, Charity)

Over the centuries, it has become a practice among the Muslims to offer their Zakat (Zakah) in the month of Ramadan. This is generally done to increase one’s blessings. However, we should remember that Zakat (Zakah) becomes due, one year after a person’s wealth reaches the value of Nisab (minimum amount) for a type of item (Gold, Silver, Savings, etc) and according to most scholars, his wealth has to remain above that Nisab level throughout the course of the year. So it is impossible for the whole Ummah to have reached the obligation of paying Zakat (Zakah), at the onset of Ramadan. We should be clear in our minds that Zakat (Zakah) is not tied in with the month of Ramadan. An individual can bring forward his Zakat (Zakah) due date (notice: not push back), in order to take advantage of the multifold blessings of Ramadan. In fact, to make it easy on the recipients whose needs have to be met, one might chose Ramadan for the extra Sadaqa he gives out.

Finally, Zakat (Zakah) is not simply the calculation of your dues on your Gold and Silver ornaments. Its scope and implication is wide-ranging. As such, it requires us to be diligent and aware of various details relating to our context and various forms of wealth. At the minimum, a learned scholar should be consulted.

Source: http://www.ezsoftech.com/ramadan/ramadan06.asp

Itikaf

Posted on: August 12, 2008

Bismillah

Itikaf is a form of worship during RamadanItikaf is a form of worship. It is formed by staying in a Mosque for a certain time. It is Ehtiyat that one should stay with the intention to worship Allah by praying formal or informal prayers although prayer is not a condition therein.

The time for this form of worship could be anytime when one is allowed to fast. The best time is the month of Ramadan, especially, the last ten days.

Conditions:

1. Intention as in the rest of the worship acts. It is necessary that the intention be made at the beginning of Itikaf so that the rule, requiring the worship act to be completed with intention, be followed thoroughly from the beginning to the end. The decision made at the beginning of the night to start Itikaf from the beginning of the following day will be open to objection. However, if one decides to start it from the beginning of the night it is not an offense to do so.

One is not allowed to change one’s mind from one Itikaf to another of the same qualities or different.

2. Belief in Islam.

3. Freedom from mental illness.

4. Fasting; thus the Itikaf of one who cannot fast for some reason is not valid.

5. Duration; which is three continuous days at least. It could be more but not less than three days.

If it is started from the beginning of a day the two nights in between will be part of the duration. Less than three days is not considered Itikaf.

That it must take place in one of these Mosques:

  • The holy Mosque in Mecca,
  • The holy Mosque of the Prophet in Medina,
  • The holy Mosque of Kufa,
  • The holy Mosque of Basrah, and
  • The Mosque which is assigned for the Friday prayer in any town or city. It is Ehtiyat, however, to complete it in any of the first four Mosques.

The roof and basement of a Mosque is part of the same and it is valid to complete Etikaf in such places of a Mosque.

Permission of the people whose permission are required such as the master for the slave, husband and parents for the wife and children if this will be against the right of the husband or causes trouble to the parents.

6. Completing it in the Mosque where it was started. Thus, going out of the Mosque without an acceptable reason will invalidate the Itikaf, regardless, one knows the rule or is ignorant or has gone out because of forgetfulness, except in the case of an emergency or one being forced or it is because of some need such as using wash room or having Taharat.

One is allowed to come out of the Mosque during Itikaf to take part in the burial of a deceased or to visit an ailing one; Going out of the Mosque for a time long enough to cause the Itikaf to become as non-existing will be considered as invalidating the same, even if one has not done it out of one’s own choice.

If one needs to have Ghusl/bath during the Itikaf and it is possible for him to have it inside the Mosque, and is not allowed to go out unless the reason for Ghusl requires him not to stay inside the Mosque.

Etikaf is originally an optional worship act but it may become obligatory because of a vow etc.

Things to avoid during Itikaf:

1. Having sex and also according to Ehtiyat kissing or playing with one’s wife;

2. According to a necessary Ehtiyat causing a semen discharge,

3. And smelling perfumes for enjoyment; it is not an offense if one cannot enjoy the perfume because of some defect in his smelling ability.

4. Selling or buying in the form of a business deal, according to a necessary Ehtiyat; there is no offense to be occupied with allowable activities as sewing or writing etc., although it is a Mustahab Ehtiyat to avoid them too.

If one needs to buy something for food and there is no one to do the buying for him, it is not an offence for him to do it.

5. Expressing bitterness in talking about worldly or religious matters in order to prove one’s ability, not the truth which is one of the best worships.

The contracts of buying or selling during Itikaf invalidate Itikaf, but such contracts will be valid.

If Itikaf is invalidated because of having sex even, during the night, expiation will be due; if it is invalidated by other things, there will be no expiation, although it is a Mustahab Ehtiyat in this case too.

The expiation for invalidating an Itikaf is to set free a slave or if this is not possible, fast for two consecutive months or if this also is not possible, feed sixty poor people.

Source: http://www.ezsoftech.com/ramadan/ramadan52.asp

Laylat al-Qadr (Arabic: لیلة القدر) (also known as Shab-e-Qadr), basically the Night of Decree or Night of Measures, is the anniversary of two[citation needed] very important dates in Islam that occurred in the month of Ramadan. Shia Muslims believe that this night is when their fate in the following year is decided and hence pray for God all night long and pray for mercy and salvation. This practice is called Ehyaa (basically meaning “revival”).

Qur’an

(Qur’an 97, 1-5)

In the name of God, the Benevolent, the Merciful.
1 Lo! We revealed it on the Night of Predestination.
2 Ah, what will convey unto thee what the Night of Power is!
3 The Night of Power is better than a thousand months.
4 The angels and the Spirit descend therein, by the permission of their Lord, with all decrees.
5 (The night is) Peace until the rising of the dawn.

The verses above regard the Night as better than one thousand months. The whole month of Ramadan is a period of spiritual training wherein believers devote much of their time to fasting, praying, recitating the Qur’an, remembering God, and giving charity. However because of the revealed importance of this night, Muslims strive harder in the last ten days of Ramadan since the Laylat al-Qadr could be one of the odd-numbered days in these last ten (the first, third, fifth, or seventh). Normally, Muslims would perform an i’tikaf in the mosque (i.e they remain in the mosque for the last ten days at a strech) for prayers and recitation.

Sunnah

Muslims often pray extra prayers on this day, particularly the night prayer. They wake, pray, and hope Allah will give them anything they may desire for on this night. Mostly, they perform tilawat (reading the Qur’an).

Those who can afford to devote their time in the remembrance of God stay in the mosque for the final ten days of Ramadan. This worship is called itikaf (retreat). They observe fast during the day and occupy themselves with the remembrance of God, performing voluntary prayers and studying the Qur’an, day and night, apart from the obligatory prayers which they perform with the congregation. Food and other necessities of life are provided for them during their stay in the mosque, thus they may not leave the precincts of the mosque except for a genuine religious purpose. Devoting time to remember God, Muslims hope to receive divine favors and blessings connected with the blessed night.

Prophet Muhammad was very particular in these regards. It is related that when the last ten days of Ramadan began, he used to keep awake the whole night and was most diligent in worship.[citation needed]

Date

All Muslims believe that the incident occurred during the last third of the month of Ramadan but they differ as to the exact date. Sunnis generally consider it to be either the 21st, 23rd, 25th, 27th, or 29th of the month; while Shi’as consider it to be either the 19th, 21st or 23rd of the month. Shi’as believe the 23rd to be the most important and 19th the least of the three.[citation needed] Conventionally, most Sunnis celebrate it throughout the night of the 27th (i.e. the night between the 26th and 27th). However, due to the uncertainty of the exact date, Muslims are recommended to observe all the nights as a matter of precaution.

Differences in lexicography

Although the literal translation of the word “Qadr” is “measure”, the day has been popularly referred to as Night of Power. The proper way to translate “Laylat al-Qadr” has led to some controversy, some Muslims claiming that “Night of Power” is a mistranslation in Abdullah Yusuf Ali translation that got popular.

The term “Night of Power” comes from The Holy Qur’an: Text, Translation and Commentary by Abdullah Yusuf Ali (died 1953) who translated surat Al-Qadr verse one as:

We have indeed revealed this (Message) in the Night of Power:

Marmaduke Pickthall translates it as:

Lo! We revealed it on the Night of Predestination.

And Muhammad Asad writes:

Behold, from on high have We bestowed this [divine writ] on the Night of Destiny.

In the corresponding note he adds, “Laylatil-Qadr” can also be translated as “the Night of Almightiness” or “the Night of Majesty”

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laylat_al-Qadr

Explaining Ramadan

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic Lunar calendar and the holiest of the four holy months. It begins with the sighting of the new moon after which all physically mature and healthy Muslims are obliged to abstain from all food, drink, gum chewing, any kind of tobacco use, and any kind of sexual contact between dawn and sunset. However, that is merely the physical component of the fast; the spiritual aspects of the fast include refraining from gossiping, lying, slandering and all traits of bad character. All obscene and irreligious sights and sounds are to be avoided. Purity of thought and action is paramount. Ordained in the Quran, the fast is an exacting act of deeply personal worship in which Muslims seek a raised level of God-consciousness. The act of fasting redirects the hearts away from worldly activities, towards The Divine.

The month of Ramadan is a time for spiritual reflection, prayer, doing good deeds and spending time with family and friends. The fasting is intended to help teach Muslims self-discipline, self-restraint and generosity. It also reminds them of the suffering of the poor, who may rarely get to eat well. It is common to have one meal (known as the Suhoor), just before sunrise and another (known as the Iftar), directly after sunset. This meal will commonly consist of dates, following the example of the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon Him. Because Ramadan is a time to spend with friends and family, the fast will often be broken by different Muslim families coming together to share in an evening meal.

Ramadan derives from the Arabic root: ramida or ar-ramad, meaning scorching heat or dryness. Since Muslims are commanded to fast during the month of Ramadan, it is believed that the month’s name may refer to the heat of thirst and hunger, or because fasting burns away one’s past sins. Muslims believe that God began revealing the Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad during Ramadan (in the year 610 C.E.). The Qur’an commands: “O ye who believe! Fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that ye may (learn) self-restraint…Ramadan is the (month) in which was sent down the Qur’an, as a guide to mankind, also clear (Signs) for guidance and judgment (between right and wrong). So every one of you who is present (at his home) during that month should spend it in fasting…” (Chapter 2, verses 183 and 185). Fasting during Ramadan did not become an obligation for Muslims until 624 C.E., at which point it became the third of the Five Pillars of Islam. The others are faith (Shahadah); prayer (Salah); charitable giving (Zakah); and the pilgrimage to Makkah (Hajj).

Another aspect of Ramadan is that it is believed that one of the last few odd-numbered nights of the month is the Laylat ul-Qadr, the “Night of Power” or “Night of Destiny.” It is the holiest night of the holiest month; it is believed to be the night on which God first began revealing the Qur’an to the Prophet Muhammad through the angel Jibril (Gabriel). This is a time for especially fervent and devoted prayer, and the rewards and blessings associated with such are manifold. Muslims are told in the Qur’an that praying throughout this one night is better than a thousand months of prayer. No one knows exactly which night it is; it is one of God’s mysteries. Additionally, Muslims are urged to read the entire Qur’an during the month of Ramadan, and its 114 chapters have been divided into 30 equal parts for this purpose.

When the first crescent of the new moon has been officially sighted by a reliable source, the month of Ramadan is declared over, and the month of Shawwal begins. The end of Ramadan is marked by a three-day period known as Eid ul-Fitr, the “Festival of Fast-breaking.” It is a joyous time beginning with a special prayer, and accompanied by celebration, socializing, festive meals and sometimes very modest gift-giving, especially to children.

When Ramadan ends, Muslims give charity in a locally prescribed amount, calculated to feed one poor person in that region for one day. This is known as fitra, and is meant as another reminder of the suffering endured by many. Many Muslims also take this occasion to pay the annual alms which are due to the poor and needy, known as Zakah (2.5% of assets).

At the beginning of Ramadan, it is appropriate to wish Muslims “Ramadan Mubarak” which means “Blessed Ramadan.” At its conclusion, you may say “Eid Mubarak.

Source: http://www.ramadan.co.uk/index1.php?page=others.htm