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Posts Tagged ‘Ajantha Mendis

“He is talented, very talented, but has no brains,” was Geoff Boycott’s on-air verdict after Virender Sehwag’s attempt to hook a ball from outside off stump found the fielder at deep square leg and triggered a first-innings collapse at the SSC.

Sehwag’s response to a question regarding his approach after his maverick innings – a 15th Test century at a strike-rate of 104.91 – was deadpan. “How can I stop the way I’ve played?” he said. “Yes, there is pressure if wickets fall and you think ‘What if I go for a shot and get out too?’ But if that happens you’re never going to score runs.”

After two batting collapses in the first Test it was imperative that India got a solid start. Sehwag provided that by using a simple mantra: if the ball is there to be hit, hit it. Circumstances rarely affect Sehwag and he put the pedal to the metal. A whip off the pads past midwicket got him started, a wild sweep that was unsuccessfully referred didn’t stall him, and when he charged Ajantha Mendis and swung him over cow corner for six, Sehwag was at full throttle.

The stand-out feature was the effortless manner in which Sehwag handled Mendis, who was virtually unplayable in Colombo. The key, in his own simple words, was that here Sehwag “picked him [Mendis] off the track, from where the ball pitched”, something only he and and Sachin Tendulkar have managed to do in this series.

When Mendis tossed the ball up on middle and off, Sehwag smothered the spin, and when the bowler drifted on to middle, he went back and turned it fine. If it spun in sharply, Sehwag adjusted his back leg and brought his bat down quickly to kill the ball. Sehwag also picked the two-fingered googly and moved back to cut or punch through the off-side. He failed to beat cover with the drive once but replayed the shot two balls later with more power and placed it to perfection. Mendis’ first four overs cost 29.

Sehwag accelerated and yet remained in control with Gautam Gambhir, fleet-footed against spin, in the passenger seat. There were cracks at one end of the pitch and Nuwan Kulasekera asked a few questions but Sehwag steered clear of them. He cut Muttiah Muralitharan’s first ball, a doosra from around the stumps, to reach his half-century off 50 balls. His strike rate, like a speedometer, fluctuated from 60 to 98 and beyond. India’s 100 came from 115 balls and Sehwag’s contribution was 59.

Like Sri Lanka did at the SSC, he and Gambhir ran hard, hustling for the second, and constantly looking for scoring opportunities. Sehwag and Aakash Chopra, another Delhi team-mate, did this effectively during the majority of their 19 partnerships, notably in Australia in 2003-04. Some of today’s singles were risky but the intent was obvious and it frustrated Sri Lanka.

In the over before lunch, Sehwag put his arm around Gambhir’s shoulder and had a word. Gambhir reached his fifty off the next ball and a beaming Sehwag rushed to congratulate him. When Sehwag dabbed a single behind point to raise the 150 partnership, he punched gloves with Gambhir as they crossed. How many batsmen can power a side to 150 for 0 at lunch? The camaraderie was plain to see.

After a four-hour rain delay, Mendis tested Gambhir with his variation but at the other end Sehwag disdainfully smashed Vaas over cow corner off his second ball after the resumption. Two balls later he played a booming straight drive to reach his century, which he celebrated with a proud wave of the bat to the dressing room and an embrace from his partner. His 15th hundred took only 87 balls with 15 fours and two sixes but the message was deeper.

At the MCG, in 2003-04, India were 311 for 3 but collapsed for 366 after Sehwag was dismissed for 195 at the end of the first day. In Adelaide earlier this year Sehwag scored 151 out of India’s 269 in the second innings. Today, Sehwag had driven India to a position of strength at 167 for 0 before four wickets fell in 20 balls for 11 runs. As he had done against England in Galle during the winter, Chaminda Vaas, rejuvenated after the rain delay, struck twice in an over. Tendulkar and Sourav Ganguly were dismissed with the score on 178 and the morning’s work had come undone.

“I didn’t notice any change in my batting after the four-hour break in play,” Sehwag said. “Every batsman has his own mindset with which he plays, but I just played my shots.” Even as stumps approached, Sehwag relied on his base instinct. Mendis went around the stumps and Sehwag used his feet to smash him down the ground and hit two consecutive fours through cover.

Sehwag had fulfilled his responsibility of providing a sound start but the collapse meant that he had to hold the innings together. His unshakeable approach did not change. “I am not satisfied because there’s plenty left in this game,” was Sehwag’s closing statement. “If I can convert this into a double-century or more tomorrow, get India above 400-500, apply pressure on Sri Lanka, then I will be satisfied.”

Crushed in Colombo, India arrived in Galle needing to find a way to bounce back. Only a vivid imagination could have conceived of a fightback without it being led by Sehwag. Like the white breakers of the Indian Ocean, lashing across the rocks in the background of the Galle International Stadium, Sehwag has injected life into a one-sided series.

He has brains alright, and he’s used them rather well.

Source: http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/slvind/content/current/story/363146.html

After India’s massive innnings and 239-run defeat in the first Test in Colombo, Arjuna Ranatunga, the former Sri Lankan captain, has criticised India’s batsmen for playing in the Twenty20 mode and said they lacked focus.

“The way the Indians have played this Test is an eye-opener not just for us but for all cricket-playing countries,” he told the Indian Express. “They dealt with this like a Twenty20 game. I think they were not prepared for Test cricket.” He was speaking after India were bowled out twice in about four sessions of play, with the Sri Lankan spinners Muttiah Muralitharan and Ajantha Mendis sharing 19 wickets.

Ranatunga wanted India to focus more on Tests than on Twenty20s. “If the Indians keep getting their priorities wrong, they will go down ranking-wise. Ultimately, it is the rank that is very important,” he said. “And it is this performance that will determine the future of the game in your country. Focusing on the Twenty20 game is a short-term thing. If the game is not protected, we are in for a major disaster.

“The Indian batsmen aren’t too focussed. That is something that can creep into our cricket. That is something I don’t want to happen,” he said. Ranatunga has repeatedly stressed that while Twenty20 generates much-needed money, playing Test cricket and representing your country should remain the priority .

India have four days to recover from the loss – their third heaviest – before the second Test starts in Galle.

Source: http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/slvind/content/story/362706.html

The gates were thrown open on Saturday at the Sinhalese Sports Club. It had nothing to do with the hosts holding the upper hand. The Papars band had infused life into the venue but it was still the Indian fans outnumbered the locals. Hence the organisers decision to give free access to fans who wanted to support Mahela Jayawardene and his boys. Entry to the two grassy “hills” situated on either side of the ground was free. Young fans had the time of their life both enjoying the mastery of Murali and playing their own tennis ball Tests during the breaks.

The Lankan post-match press conference was a riot. Mahela was asked to translate the answers by Mendis speaking in Sinhalese. It was nice to see Mahela ensuring the newcomer felt at home. Murali’s casual jibe at the inability of South Africa, New Zealand and England to play spin was another light moment. The trio thoroughly enjoyed their interaction with the media and full marks to the SLCA that made it a point that the performers of the day met with the press, even if it was to be more than one player.

Ajantha Mendis is a busy man these days. The spinner who was recently promoted as a second lieutenant by the army hardly finds time between matches, cutting ribbons and endorsing brands. Life has changed so much for him after the Asia Cup final that he has to do away with his old mobile number. A big fan of Hindi film music, he says it has been difficult to keep the girls away. “The response from girls has been impressive. I don’t have a clue how they get my number but a boy of my age should not complain when so many girls smile at you.”

Muttiah Muralitharan is known for his charity work. The Senegama relief camp near Galle has been a passion for him since the tsunami. He also makes it a point to visit the camp whenever he finds time between matches.

Source: http://www.deccan.com/Sports/Sports.asp